Overview of Head Positioning after retinal procedures.
Why positioning is important after surgery with gas or oil in the eye.
Discussion of different acceptable methods of positioning after surgery.
Discussion of when positioning usually starts and stops after surgery.
Overview of eye anatomy with videos showing the parts of the eye and how the eye works.
Overview of positioning rationale, strategy, and recommendations for patients undergoing macular hole surgery.
Positioning, rationale, and strategy for patients undergoing Pneumatic Retinopexy (office procedure)for Retinal Detachment.
Positioning, rationale, and strategy for patients undergoing Vitrectomy (operating room procedure) for Retinal Detachment.
Positioning, rationale, and recommendations for patients undergoing pneumatic displacement of macular hemorrhage in the office (uncommon procedure).
Overview of different gasses used in the eye reviewing their size and duration of action.
Overview of properties of silicone oil used in the eye.

Head Positioning after Retinal Surgery

NEVER FLY IN AN AIRPLANE OR DRIVE TO HIGH ALTITUDE WITH GAS IN YOUR EYE - YOU WILL GO BLIND!

Head position for patients after retinal procedures is often critical to the success of the procedure. Yet is difficult to explain and difficult to understand. This site is designed to help make head positioning more understandable for patients.

Overview - Menu on Top Left

The top buttons on the left provide an overview of head positioning: what it is, why it is important, how to position, and how long to position. There is also an overview of eye anatomy that is helpful when trying to understand the rationale for head positioning after surgery.

Specific Procedures - Macular Hole, Retinal Detachment

The middle menu on the left outlines recommendations relevant to specific retinal procedures that commonly involve post-operative head positioning.

Different Intra-ocular Tamponades - Gas and Oil

The bottom menu on the left explains the characteristics of different substances used commonly for intraocular tamponade after surgeries that require positioning.