Overview of Head Positioning after retinal procedures.
Why positioning is important after surgery with gas or oil in the eye.
Discussion of different acceptable methods of positioning after surgery.
Discussion of when positioning usually starts and stops after surgery.
Overview of eye anatomy with videos showing the parts of the eye and how the eye works.
Overview of positioning rationale, strategy, and recommendations for patients undergoing macular hole surgery.
Positioning, rationale, and strategy for patients undergoing Pneumatic Retinopexy (office procedure)for Retinal Detachment.
Positioning, rationale, and strategy for patients undergoing Vitrectomy (operating room procedure) for Retinal Detachment.
Positioning, rationale, and recommendations for patients undergoing pneumatic displacement of macular hemorrhage in the office (uncommon procedure).
Overview of different gasses used in the eye reviewing their size and duration of action.
Overview of properties of silicone oil used in the eye.

What is Head Positioning?

Positioning after retinal surgery involves keeping your RETINA in a certain position relative to THE CENTER OF THE EARTH. The retina lines the back 2/3 of the eye.

In order to position your retina, you need to position your eye, which is attached to your head, which is attached to your body. So post-operative position is a whole body experience. Your eye position is determined by where you are looking. When you are looking toward the center of the earth, your eye position is down and a bubble in your eye will rise to the back of your eye where your macula is. If you are looking straight across the room with your eyes open, a bubble in your eye will rise and push on the top of your eye which will cover some of your retina.

The position of a gas bubble in your eye is determined entirely by your eye position. The amount of your retina covered will depend on the size of the bubble in your eye.